The One Tonne Life project has ended and the content on this web page is static and is not updated any more. The project was unique and pioneering, making the conclusions and all information connected to the project just as interesting and up-to-date today as when it was run. Read more about the project and get inspired! (March 2017)

One Tonne Life
Vattenfall

Give your white goods some love

We tend to forget about all things that function well. But if you give your white goods the love they deserve, you’ll be doing both your wallet and the environment a big favour. What’s this all about, you might well ask?

Take for example the Lindell family. They have cutting-edge white goods that are superbly efficient, the very best in the Siemens range, but what good will they do if they do not get the care they deserve? When it comes to the fridge and freezer, the term “care” means

– Checking the temperature, -18°C and 5°C in the freezer and fridge respectively
– Vacuum-cleaning twice a year under and behind the units
– Regularly checking and wiping dry all the seals

I asked the family to check the temperatures inside the freezer and refrigerator. In order to get an accurate reading from the fridge, you have to place a thermometer in a glass of water and let it remain overnight. In the Lindell family’s fridge, the temperature was zero degrees. That’s an unnecessary waste of energy without in any way benefiting the food inside. In the freezer the temperature was -20°C. Every degree increases electricity consumption by 5%. Two degrees means 10% waste of electricity. In terms of the number of kWh one might be tempted to think this is of marginal difference since these are after all high-efficiency white goods. But the principle of “every little counts” is as important here as it is anywhere else.

So give your white goods the love they deserve, take care of them and they’ll serve you loyally year after year, repaying you by being kind to your wallet and our environment.

Lars Ejeklint, Vattenfall

What is One Tonne Life?

Is it possible to live carbon neutral today?

Every Swede contributes to the greenhouse effect with six to eight tonnes of CO2 per year.

With energy-smart housing, electric cars and clean energy, we could go on living almost as usual. Couldn't we? What does it really take for a family to live carbon neutral?

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